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Ambulance delays in Montrose revealed

The Scottish Ambulance service has come under fire after has been revelead it took the body more than 20 minutes to respond to serious incidents in the North East on hundreds of occasions in the last year.

The Scottish Ambulance service has come under fire after has been revelead it took the body more than 20 minutes to respond to serious incidents in the North East on hundreds of occasions in the last year.

It has been revealed that on 20 occasions it has taken the local ambulance service more than 20 minutes to respond to life-threatening calls in Montrose.

Alison McInnes, Liberal Democrat MSP for North East Scotland, has called for an urgent investigation after new figures uncovered by the Scottish Liberal Democrats revealed the Ambulance Service took more than 20 minutes to respond to serious incidents in the North East on hundreds of occasions in the last year.

In Dundee ambulances took longer than 20 minutes to responds to life-threatening ‘category A’ emergency calls on 30 occasions in 2013-14.

The other areas most frequently seeing ambulances taking longer than 20 minutes to respond to a ‘category A’ calls included Arbroath on 25 occasions, Montrose on 20 and Forfar on 7.

The Scottish Government’s response time target for a ‘category A’ is eight minutes.

Mrs McInnes said: “Our Ambulance Service does fantastic, life-saving work in our communities every day. But I think Ambulance Service staff would be amongst the first to recognise that the figures for towns and cities across the North East are hugely concerning.

“When people suffer serious health problems like heart attack or stroke, a rapid response is crucial. But on hundreds of occasions during the last year alone it took 20 minutes or longer to reach people in the North East involved in a life-threatening situation.

“In the most remote parts of the North East, reaching emergency response targets is always likely to be a challenge.

“However, people will have questions over why some of

 

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