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GE help restore plane

Volunteers from across the community have helped to restore one of the worlds oldest jet fighter planes.

Volunteers from across the community have helped to restore one of the worlds oldest jet fighter planes.

More than 20 GE Oil & Gas volunteers have helped bring back to life one of the world’s oldest jet fighter planes, currently on display at the Montrose Air Station Heritage Centre.

The first Meteor flew in 1944, with early models in squadron service during the height of the Second World War; their speed making them highly valuable in shooting down the V-1 missiles directed against London in the closing stages of the conflict.

The Gloster Meteor T7 which now calls the Angus-based military museum home, was in service with the No. 603 Squadron and is on long-term loan from the squadron association.

Museum curator, Dan Paton, said: “When the aircraft arrived, I despaired at the prospect of what was essentially a pile of aviation junk ever being made to look like a real plane again. One of our members, Jim Underwood - who worked on Meteors in the RAF - got hold of a manual and, with the help of our other museum volunteers, re-assembled the aircraft.

“The GE Volunteers then came on board, helping us with the arduous and time-consuming task of rubbing down the old paintwork in order to prepare the Meteor for repainting. Once finished, the aircraft will be a wonderful sight for our visitors and is a great symbol of the contribution that local businesses can make.

“We’re very grateful for their help.”

 

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