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Second plaque for Hillside artist Adam Christie to be unveiled

Dave Ramsay with the commemorative plaque in memory of Adam Christie, which was erected in May at Sleepyhillock Cemetery where he is buried in a pauper's grave. Another plaque just like this one will be unveiled in Christie's birthplace of Shetland next month.

Dave Ramsay with the commemorative plaque in memory of Adam Christie, which was erected in May at Sleepyhillock Cemetery where he is buried in a pauper's grave. Another plaque just like this one will be unveiled in Christie's birthplace of Shetland next month.

The final two stages of a seven-year project to preserve the story and work of Hillside artist Adam Christie are being put in place.

On May 7 at Sleepyhillock cemetery in Montrose, where Christie was buried in a pauper’s grave, a Historic Scotland commemorative plaque in memory of the artist was unveiled to mark the 64th anniversary of his death.

A second Historic Scotland plaque is now to due to be revealed on August 30 in Christie’s birthplace of Aith, Cunningsburgh, Shetland.

After suffering from mental illness in his youth, Christie was admitted to Sunnyside Royal Hospital in Hillside.

He died in 1950 at the age of 84, having spent almost 50 years in the hospital.

During his time in Sunnyside he developed a talent for painting and sculpture, creating stone sculptures and painting using basic tools.

Dave Ramsay, a local singer songwriter from Arbroath but now based in Catterline, has been campaigning for greater recognition for Christie and has been invited to Shetland by the Christie family to be part of the unveiling ceremony.

He said: “It is tremendous recognition by Historic Scotland that they have agreed to fund two plaques to commemorate Adam’s talents, and a specially designed plinth by the Christie family has been constructed to receive the plaque, which is a fitting memorial to recognise the twin strands of Adam’s life.

“This has been a major project, but to see national and local recognition coming to Adam and his descendants to have a permanent stone memorial, in the Adam Christie style, placed at the artists’s grave in Sleepyhillock.”

This is scheduled for September to mark when Christie and three other men erected a plaque in 1930 to commemorate when Robert Burns stopped to water his horse on his Highland tour of 1787.

A rowan tree, of the aptly named variety, Joseph Rock, was also planted in the free ground at Sleepyhillock in April in memory of Christie.

 

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