Sea Dog honoured by St Bernards

20110724- St Bernards at Bamse statue. 'The Scottish St. Bernard's Club visited Bamse statue on Sunday where a one minutes silence was held in memory of the atrocities in Norway. ''"Andy Thompson Photography", '"Copyright Andy Thompson Photography", '"No use without payment", '"www.atimages.com",

20110724- St Bernards at Bamse statue. 'The Scottish St. Bernard's Club visited Bamse statue on Sunday where a one minutes silence was held in memory of the atrocities in Norway. ''"Andy Thompson Photography", '"Copyright Andy Thompson Photography", '"No use without payment", '"www.atimages.com",

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MEMBERS of the St Bernard Club of Scotland visited Montrose on Sunday to honour the memory of the historic Sea Dog Bamse.

They performed a ‘Promenade of St Bernards’ at the statue, then assembled again at the Bamse Gravesite, at the Cobden Street car park.

Twenty-two St Bernards from all over Scotland and Northumberland took part.

It was 67 years to the day since the funeral of the legendary Second World War Norwegian dog, when hundreds of servicemen and local people paraded from the docks to the grave.

The visitors were greeted by members of Montrose Heritage Trust and by Angus Whitson and Andrew Orr, authors of the book about Bamse, who recounted the story.

Local dogs and owners joined the proceedings as everyone walked to the grave and the visitors laid a specially commissioned painted stone.

Judy McMurray, secretary of the St Bernard Club of Scotland, said: “Some things don’t change - the love, devotion and loyalty of this magnificent breed being the main one. The club felt that Bamse was a perfect example of this.”

Mr Orr added: “We are delighted to see so many St Bernards and their owners here today, paying their respects to a heroic war time dog. The statue erected by Montrose Heritage Trust in 2006 has certainly ensured his commemoration, and draws many visitors to Montrose”

In view of the devastating events in Norway a minute’s silence was held at noon. Mr Orr said: “It was very moving. During that minute you could have heard a pin drop. Not even a lorry went by.”