William Lamb Studio open for summer

Friends of William Lamb chairman Norman Atkinson; John Johnston, from Angus Council's Museum Service; and Fern Insh, the new seasonal assistant who will be starting work at the studio this summer are pictured by the bust of T. Maule Guthrie M.
Friends of William Lamb chairman Norman Atkinson; John Johnston, from Angus Council's Museum Service; and Fern Insh, the new seasonal assistant who will be starting work at the studio this summer are pictured by the bust of T. Maule Guthrie M.

The William Lamb studio is now open for the summer season and this year for the first time tours of the building will be given.

Montrose-born artist William Lamb gifted his studio to the people of Montrose when he died in 1951. He had trained as an artist with his right-hand but after being sent to war during World War One he injured his right hand, incapacitating it, and after the war he had to retrain as a left-hander.

The studio opened its doors today (Wednesday, July 1) and will be open until Saturday, August 29 Tuesdays to Saturdays from 2 to 5 pm.

For the first time, the Friends of William Lamb will also be arranging a series of special tours, talks and events this year called ‘Friends Wednesdays Afternoons’ from July 8.

On Friday (June 26) the Friends of William Lamb at the invitation of Angus Council’s Museum Service attended a reception to the start of the summer season at the Lamb Studio.

Hilary White, secretary, said: “Chairman of the Friends, Norman Atkinson thanked Angus Council for the invitation and for all they do to maintain this jewel in the crown of Angus.

“He spoke of our activities in 2015 – a particularly busy year for the group – and for plans for the future including a new guide to the studio and a catalogue of the sculpture.

“He encouraged more people to join the Friends and for local organisations to arrange visits for guided tours.

“William Lamb, perhaps the finest sculptor that Scotland has ever produced, was born in Montrose in 1893 and spent most of his working life in the town.

“On his death in 1951 he left his studio in Market Street, together with his collections of artworks, to the people of the town.

“This studio is now maintained as a small museum and gallery and contains an exceptional collection of Lamb’s internationally important works – sculptures in wood, stone and bronze, etchings and water colours and over 1700 preparatory drawings for his work.

“The Friends support the Angus Council with the promotion of Lamb, his works and the studio, helping with special openings and arranging talks and visits.

“We are especially pleased that the Studio regularly registers a five star ranking on TripAdvisor and other similar sites, drawing visitors from all over the world.”